Comment on the Super League: Don’t turn the gravedigger of football into heroes – Ceferin is no less cynical than the dreamers

As nice as it is that a very broad front against the nonsense idea called Super League has formed immediately, you have to be clear with whom you are protesting: The front line here does not run between good and bad, football lovers and passion simulators and reason and megalomania . But between infinite greed and even more greed. A comment.

Thankfully, English old international Gary Neville has almost everything there is to say about this pinnacle of idiocy called the Super League in his around three minute epic rant voiced.

The outbreak of the Manchester United icon at Sky against the “pure greed” of the “impostors” in the boardrooms of the twelve renegades got under the skin. Sure, Neville, as a player, coach and expert, has benefited from this absurdly depraved system of professional football. But his angry speech seemed like a credible manifesto for a truer, purer, more lovable football, delivered by a man who really loves football.

What one can in no way say about everyone who has been hyperventilating since Sunday and proclaiming the decline of football and daring to shout “enough is enough”. No question about it, Florentino Perez, Andrea Agnelli, Joel Glazer and the other Super League dreamers are greedy heads who can’t get their necks full and trample on all the values ​​that their clubs once stood for.

But that applies just as much to many who suddenly appear as guardians of the grail of sporting competition and guardians of the values ​​and culture not only of football, but of the entire continent. UEFA President Alexander Ceferin admitted his disappointment and anger towards the renegades.

Super League: Rummenigge suddenly voice of reason

But without turning red, on the one hand, to call the Super League dreamers false snakes and to declare the complicated, no less devastating concept of a reformed Champions League as a “fantastic project” requires a rather shifted worldview. When Ceferin then said that the reformed Champions League would “enable long-term viability, prosperity and growth for everyone in European football”, it sounded like sheer mockery.

Who, if not people like Ceferin, FIFA boss Gianni Infantino, their predecessors and windy partners, brought football to where it is now? Who created this insatiable monster who always needs more – more games, more competitions, more money, more power? Who is responsible for the fact that Bayern Munich’s CEO Karl-Heinz Rummenigge is really considered the voice of reason?

As nice as it is basically that a very broad front against the Super League has formed immediately, you have to be clear with whom you are protesting: The front line here does not run between good and bad, football lovers and passion simulators, between reason and megalomania.

The front line runs between infinite greed and even more greed. Between people who, after years of threatening backroom consultations, want to create a Super League overnight, and guys who, in the middle of a pandemic, extort guarantees from the host cities of EM 2020 to play in front of spectators.

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